Saturday, March 16, 2019

Death and Doom!

No idea how to read French, but this woodcut feels right.

In the new WFRP, all Reiklanders start with a talent Dooming that sounds cool: a priest of Morr has foretold your death upon seeing you at birth. But in the game it's pretty lame: a flat bonus to XP for the next character and no mention of the specific prophecy received? Let's rad it up a little.

Roll on the charts below (or create a Dooming death yourself) to determine what the priest saw upon your birth. If you are faced with a situation that may kill your character but which does not match your Dooming, you gain 1 free Fortune (reroll). This occurs when you are (a) reduced to 0 wounds, (b) receive a critical wound, or (c) receive a deadly condition like Ablaze, drowning, Poisoned, etc. However, you must (a) make a Fear test, (b) receive a -10% to all tests, and (c) lose 1 Fortune point when you face a potentially deadline situation that suits your Dooming. The GM has final say if the situation could conceivably match your Dooming; if it is possible, although unlikely, then the Dooming still fits your situation. Doomings are suitably vague to convey this.

Roll Dooming based on the season you were born into (25% chance of each season, first 25 spring, etc.):

D100 DOOMING OF SPRING
1 to 4 Pride comes before a fall
5 to 8 Ivy will claw at your skin and prick like a rose
9 to 12 Health is not always healthy
13 to 16 Still waters run deep
17 to 20 The forest will strike back when the campfire is low
21 to 24 Do not pluck low-hanging fruit
25 to 28 The serpent is in the garden
29 to 32 Climb not the mighty oak
33 to 36 Beware fairy rings and standing stones
37 to 40 The land will reclaim what is hers
41 to 44 Do not stare directly into the light
45 to 48 Good intentions create bad situations
49 to 52 Do not accept trust lightly
53 to 56 There is always another problem
57 to 60 Light burns just as much as it heals
61 to 64 Radiance can’t illuminate all
65 to 68 Charity will cause your end
69 to 72 Underestimate no one
73 to 76 Birth is but the start of death
77 to 80 Provide no succor to the blind man
81 to 84 Do not pick up discarded coins
85 to 88 Twice for poison, thrice for a kiss
89 to 92 Fate is cruel, but ironic
93 to 96 A trick is not an illusion
97 to 100 You will be stabbed by your own knife

The other two seasons can be found in the Zweihander RPG rulebook in the Character Creation chapter (52-53 in my printed copy). These should give you an idea for what the doomings sound like though, even if you don't have Zweihander to do it for you.

Tuesday, February 26, 2019

Battle & Siege Rules


Rules for battles and sieges! It's a lot of combat, and your PCs may die! Anyway, these are written for my game so WFRP4 but should work on pretty much any ancient/medieval rpg. The rules are based on King Arthur Pendragon RPG as adapted in Red & Pleasant Land setting book, so they are not original but are adapted for my game.

The procedure is thus:

  1. Setup. Preliminarily, figure out what's going on with the battle: whose forces are fighting whose and where. This is probably determined by whatever adventure you're on, but it should influence the Battle Table of enemies [see below] and possible events. After you know generally what the battle's 'about,' come up with a list of enemies and battle events the PCs will face: the Battle Table, which is a list of combat encounters from weakest/easiest to strongest/hardest. Then figure out the PCs' objective in the battle. Are they trying to kill a particular notable (even the enemy general)? Are they trying to get past the battle to the enemy camp? Simply survive their sector of battle? 
  2. Enter the field - first encounter! This first fight will be important for setting the tone of the rest of the battle, and tell your players that. The number of combat rounds (hereinafter "#") to win will determine how many encounters the PCs will have before they reach their objective (set in step 1). For this first encounter, ask the party how they are entering the field and give them two options from the Battle Table (or provide a unique set of options based on the PCs options). For example, the PCs chose to be on the flank of the force and can either charge into the enemy or attempt to sneak around to a group of archers on the hill. Or it's a siege and they can either fight a group of soliders climbing ladders or face the siege tower about to drop its plank. Then fight as normal with combat rules (roll initiative, roll attack, etc.) and you/DM track the number of rounds (#) it takes to defeat them. Again, this is the number of encounters the PCs must go through to reach their objective.
  3. Battle encounters continue. Now roll 1d5 + # to determine the next enemy or event from the Battle Table, and that's who attack the PCs next. The number of rounds each of these subsequent encounters takes determines the roll on the enemies chart, but # from the first encounter is how many encounters occur. After each subsequent encounter roll 1d5 + # of the last encounter to determine who the PCs fight next. So, the first encounter took 4 rounds to complete, then there will be four 'fights'/encounters in this battle; the next encounter takes 5 rounds to finish, roll 1d5 + 5 for the next encounter, etc.  Continue running encounters until the PCs win or are defeated.
  4. The last encounter. For the last encounter, the DM should swap in the PCs' objective if that's a fight like defeating the enemy leader or fighting among the enemy's camp or whatever. If the PCs want to retreat before they finish their fighting, they simply fail their objective (not good if they were simply trying to survive the siege).


The Battle Table
You need a table of battle encounters for this to work. Start numbering it at 2, as this is the minimum you'll have. Some considerations in making your chart. If the battle is dire and the odds are stacked against the PCs' allies, increase the number of enemies in each encounter and difficulty of encounters, or vice versa for an advantageous situation (e.g. good thing you gathered extra allies through the last series of adventures). Below is a sample siege Battle Table I'm planning on using if that's the way my adventures go (note I have 2-3 PCs only right now, so the number of enemies reflects that, and this would be very difficult fight):

No.
Encounter
Attributes
2
5 Peasant Conscripts
30s, Spears or Axes +7, W12, AP3
3
5 Recruit Men-at-Arms
30s, WS 35, Spears or Swords +7, W12, AP5 shields
4
5 Men-at-Arms
30s, WS40, Spears or Swords +7, W12, AP6 gambesons + shields
5
5 Bowmen
30s, WS35, BS40, Longbows +7 (damaging, impale) or Maces +7, W12, AP4 gambesons
6
5 Men-at-Arms and volleys of arrows every other round
30s, WS40, Spears or Swords +7, W12, AP6 gambesons + shields; Dodge or Parry 2x arrows each volley or Dam. 9
7
5 Veteran Men-at-Arms
35s, WS45, Spears or Swords +7, W12, AP8 mail + shields
8
1d5+1 Knights Errant
35s, WS45, Sword +7, or Lance if mtd. +10 (impact, impale), W12, AP9 (part. Plate + shield) [Charger: S45, T35, WP15, W22, Large, trample +7]
9
Siege weapon (trebuchet) impact then 5 Veteran Men-at-Arms
35s, WS45, Spears or Swords +7, W12, AP8 mail + shields; Dodge or D15+1d10 and knocked prone, nearby structures collapse
10
1d5 Knights of the Realm
40s, WS50, Flail +9 (-10% defense) or Lance if mtd. +12 (impact, impale), W12, AP10 (Plate + shield) [Destrier: S50, T40, WP15, W22, AP5, Large, trample +8]
11
1d5 Knights of the Realm and volleys of arrows every other round
40s, WS50, Flail +9 (-10% defense) or Lance if mtd. +12 (impact, impale), W12, AP10 (Plate + shield) [Destrier: S50, T40, WP15, W22, AP5, Large, trample +8]
12
Named Lord + 1d5 Knights of the Realm
Lord 50s, WS65, Bastard Sword +12 (damaging, defensive) or Lance if mtd. +12 (impact, impale), W15, AP9 (Plate) [Destrier: S50, T40, WP15, W22, AP5, Large, trample +8]
13
Siege weapon (trebuchet) impact then 3 Honor Guard
45s, WS60, Bastard Sword +13 (damaging, defensive) or Lance if mtd. +12 (impact, impale), W14, AP9 (Plate); Fearless in battle, Reversal if win combat, Relentless (spend 1 adv. to ignore 1 condition); Dodge or D15+1d10 and knocked prone, nearby structures collapse
14
Marshall + 1d5 Honor Guard
Marshall 50s, WS70, Silverine Sword +11 (damaging, ignore 2 APs) or Lance if mtd. +13 (impact, impale), W17, AP12 (Plate+shield), Furious Assault (2x attacks if no move) [Destrier: S50, T40, WP15, W22, AP5, Large, trample +8]

Monday, February 25, 2019

OSR Influence on Running Not Old D&D

Anyone who runs RPGs must read and think about this.

While I'm not currently running any "Old School" rulesets, which would include rpgs based on original D&D, basic/expert 1980s D&D, first edition or second edition AD&D, and their various reorganized reprints (Lamentations of the Flame Princess, Basic Fantasy Roleplay, OSRIC, Labyrinth Lord, Swords & Wizardry, etc.), my DMing, adventure creation, etc. are all heavily influenced by the Old School sensibility.

For me, what this breaks down is primarily the ethos of letting the players set the course of the adventures. While I will set up interesting shit in the world, create NPCs and their machinations and plots, the players will always be who decide what they do. Any choices they make will impact the world logically, so they will bear the repercussions of their actions. But like in Old School play, if they fuck with a dragon, I'm not going to 'protect' them based on their level. My players have done some crazy shit, and it was as hard as it would be no matter their character stats or whatever. So when they broke into an enemy castle by themselves, it was filled with enemies and they almost died. In fact, as would later happen when they invaded a skaven stronghold beneath a city, some critical hits with burning oil flasks was all that stood between them and death.

As a corollary of that player-driven plots and play, I've adopted numerous tools from the Old School Renaissance folks (see blogs to the right) for writing adventures and settings. Now, my prep for a campaign is in this order: (1) pick rules, (2) define for myself a general campaign idea - currently, rival knightly houses with some chaos (dark magic) corruption, (3) write down the first starting adventure hook/idea and the initial major NPCs (currently, investigate a dungeon beneath a vassal nobleman's tower, NPCs being his liege, Lady Griselda, and her rival/neighbor Lord Chrodegar), and (4) start playing. More ideas will flow after that first adventure, so I write up a few ideas I have and start plotting the next adventure. When I say plotting, this is old school too: just some adventure hooks. NPC X wants you to do Y thing related to his/her goals, and offers Z reward for doing so.

Practically, I will say that while you introduce the overall campaign theme (e.g. rival knightly houses, a little Game of Thrones-y with chaos monsters), then do character creation. The characters should (will) influence what kinds of adventures you sketch out. So in my current game, I have a 'fighter' and a spy/rogue type, so I want adventures to have elements for both of them to do - fight stuff and negotiate and spy. This means I want to keep it often human focused, so my spy player-character can talk to stuff and use his gossip and charm abilities, and that will often revolve around defeating something in combat too.

I focus on writing down adventure hooks (basic ideas) and then some decision points early on in the adventure. Then I use the kind of resources created by the Old School Renaissance to actually run the adventure. This will be stuff like random encounter charts, monster and NPC stats for those the PCs will fight, and other rules stuff that I can pick up as I'm running and have some fun interactions. For others, this will be a basic dungeon they found too. Having some maps around or drawn up is key. So for my current campaign, I created a big doc with basic stats (knights, horses, etc.), a list of random encounters, and a chart with 20 major NPCs. Then we made PCs. I drew up my first dungeon map, and played the first adventure. It was great, and the wonderful session reports have flowed from there.

Another corollary of the Old School-style impact of player choice on the game is requiring in-game, in-character descriptions of what characters are doing. Trying to cut down on "I make a gossip roll" or a "Stealth check" (some may call this a "simulationist" style). This breaks the fun and imagination game you're playing. "I make is Stealth check" is suited for a video game (maybe), but not a game driven by talking with your friends. So, generally I try to ask for the players to describe what their character is doing or have them speak in voice, and then I as DM will tell them what to roll (if anything). Procedurally, this is a lot of asking what they do, and refusing answers that are simply a check/roll (exception: attack rolls can be described 'gamey' like I attack or whatever) - "No, what is Boneshard actually doing." Then I use the skill/ability roll to determine how I describe the outcome.

So why not Old School rules or Dungeons?

I found that while I have been blown away and engrossed by the creativity, good ideas, and practical advice for running rpgs the OSR folks have offered, when I in fact have run the old school rules, I have been dissatisfied. The main problem is that I don't like running dungeons (small dungeon-esque adventures are great though). When I do, I miss NPC interactions, and in-world politics. The dispute between groups of subhumans in a hole is not enough. I also could give a shit about tracking light, precise encumbrance, etc. My players get bored and frustrated by this stuff too. As a DM, I also hate how D&D games use hit points: it is too disassociated a mechanic. Like a 5th level human or dwarf can have like 40 hp, but an ogre will only have 4d8=16-20 on average? It doesn't comport. Another rules concern is that I see how fun it is for players to have characters with a bunch of different powers, even if they are a fighter or whatever.

So for me, I've had more fun actually running Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay (WFRP). I ran a long basic D&D campaign using Adventurer Conqueror King, several shortish campaigns using a slightly house-ruled version of Lamentations (level-less spells), and two D&D 5e campaigns (currently 1 now). The basic rules do well in a large group, but then I run into the problems with hit point inflation and my frustration keeping combat (which is fun for me and the players) gritty and as realistic as I like. Even bare-bones rulesets suffer from superheroism at a certain level (5-6+) due to hit points and healing magic, with a silly level of lethality at low levels.

Another factor is that all my house rules are in the direction of stuff WFRP is already doing: different armor and weapons effects, critical hits charts, wild magic charts, on-the-spot rulings to adjudicate catching on fire or whatever. So while there are alot of rules in WFRP compared to Basic D&D/Lamentations or whatever, they're all rules I'm using anyway and are not really much different from +/- 25% probability changes anyway.

All of this is to say that I'm finding you can run a contemporary rules with an old school mentality, especially on the DM side, and have a lot of fun.

[WFRP4 Session Reports] It's Not Going Well Anywhere


Characters: Boneshard, Norscan Berserker (Marauder career); Regis d'Pubiens, Bretonnian Spy

After escaping Agravaine's Castle, the wounded adventurers make their way back to the camp of the besieging army of Ermengard to find it's all falling apart in true bleak fashion. The Plague has broken out openly among many of the troops, the adventurers' patron, Lord Chrodegar has lost his son to it and he was wounded in the assault meant as a distraction, and Lord Ermengard, Agravaine's rival, is dying in his tent for it. Chrodegar is disgusted that the adventurers were not able to slay Agravaine when they sacrificed many good men at the gates, and gruffly tells them to basically fuck off. After having their wounds bandaged, they leave.

A rough approximation of Lord Chrodegar's situation.

Boneshard and Regis then see Lady Griselda gathering her belongings to leave camp with the slumbering Duke Armand. Having not foiled Agravaine, the Duke still slumbers in a magical coma induced by the priestess Damsel Helvis to preserve him from the plague or poison that would otherwise kill him. The adventurers tell Griselda of the Skaven inside the keep, and she recalls to them that there is a book on the foul ratmen in the University of Bordeleaux. She also invites them back to her Castle Sangraine, should they wish. The cause of Ermengard is doomed. The adventurers bid her adieu, planning to investigate Bordeleaux for the book rather than refuge with her.

The adventurers return to their tent, seeking supplies, but are confronted by a helmed knight and three men at arms about to carry off their chest. Boneshard is enraged, and though wounded badly from the castle, he seeks to stop them. He is knocked unconscious in the fight, and Regis lets them pass. All the adventurers' gold, aside from a few in their pockets is lost.

Fortunately, they still have horses and set off for Bordelaux after Boneshard is roused by a doctor treatment. On the road, they meet penitents who offer them some minor succor, and recognize that Boneshard also bears the plague. They later reach Bordeleaux, bribe the ferry guard who are nominally keeping a quarantine of the city.


Seeking their old contact Doctor Pycellus, they learn there is a book on the ratmen stored in a locked chamber of forbidden lore in a university tower. Negotiating with the Provost, they are allowed to access it. Regis spends a few days studying the book, The Prophecy of Guillaime the Mad, or the Revelations of the Great Horned One, learning much of the ways of the ratmen but hearing strange voices in his head, picking up on previously unknown odors, and generally going a bit mad himself (4 corruption points, mechanically). Meanwhile, Boneshard sweated through a Ratte Fever but emerged alive and somewhat healthy.



The Prophecy revealed that, from signs all the ratcatchers in town are missing and encountering a ratman assassin behind their inn as well, a great convergence of Morrslieb, the Blood Moon, signaled that the ratmen would be attacking the city itself in a fortnight! The sign of the Great Horned One embossed in reddened flesh on Duke Armand's chest, seen by the adventurers when they saw him struck down in Ermengard's camp, revealed that the ratmen had obtained an ancient Nehekaran idol, the Idol of Flies, which empowered their plagues and the swelling of the numbers. What Lord Agravaine's role was in all this was unclear, but he must have had some hand!

The adventurers then sought audience with the Duke of Bordeleaux, Alberich. He reluctantly granted an audience, as Boneshard and Regis showed signet rings as agents of Duke Armand. Learning of the prophecized attack, the Duke was convinced to render aid. To find the Idol, the elvish ambassador, Menilthir scryed for them its location. The Duke called upon a picked band of knights, and Menilthir offered two of his honor guard, to accompany the adventurers into the old elvish-wrought sewers to seek the Idol. They set off into the dark...



Thursday, February 14, 2019

[WFRP4] Bretonnia, Land of Chivalry!


I've been working on this toolkit-style setting guide to Bretonnia in the Warhammer world for awhile. Basically, I've always loved the way supplements like Vornheim and Red & Pleasant Land and D&D adventures with random encounter charts generate adventures from player characters just being in a place. On the other hand, the type of adventure hooks and NPCs and encounters I want trend towards the vanilla--knights and sorcerers and ogres and shit--and most of the well done, random encounter type products are oriented to the Weird. While something like that is wildly creative, not so useful to me as a DM as it always just results in silliess and I get bored.

Additionally, I find I really enjoy most running adventures with a lot of politics--different human factions, really. I'm a historian by education and my tastes run towards reading history books with real world insights about what humans do with violence and power.

Finally, I really do not enjoy running large dungeon crawls. I get bored, it's not exciting or tense for me. It's a good adventure oftentimes, but I have to keep it small. I'd rather see what effects the decisions of the players have on a web of factions or NPCs.

I've run some King Arthur Pendragon, but the system was too fiddly and created unrealistic situations, and the adventures for that are inspirational but boring railroads to actuall run (not a lot of player choice, get's boring for all involved). I decided I'd much rather have a freeform adventure idea kit than these, built for rpg systems I like.

So I started putting together the above to let me use as an adventure idea generator and run my campaign. Originally, I was going to run this with D&D/Lamentations of the Flame Princess home rules, but after a few sessions, I found I didn't like it as much as using the new Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay rules. My players seemed happy with those rules too, so it was all good.

Here's what the setting book has:

  • A list of Bretonnian (Old French) names, a random virtue/vice chart for creating NPCs
  • A set of "common" encounters for when you just need some orcs or whatever, with WFRP stats. I use this stat block quite a bit.
  • Rules for Bretonnian characters in WFRP4. Two new careers: Bretonnian Knights and Grail Pilgrims. Rules for Religion of the Lady.
  • A list of major NPCs with traits and relations.
  • A 100 entry encounter table based on a hexcrawl found on the internet called Hexcrawl of the Marcher Lords, Skerple's War entries from his blog, and other sources. There's some references to other d100 encounter tables that I'll remove/update one day.
  • A list of 50 quests based on this awesome blog post so the DM can simply roll what the PCs lord or patron tells them to do, if all else fails. 
What it doesn't have is how I actually run the games which is Warhammery investigation - chaos influence or dark pacts, plus lots of brutal WFRP combat (mostly player instigated when an NPC with a sword tries to tell them what to do), plus a realistic/historicalistic medieval society. Nobles have ranks, power, peasants are oppressed and ignorant, bailiffs are a thing, and the noble families with castles and sworn knights fight over land. (I'm reading A Hundred Years War vol. 1 and its really inspirational for this game.) There are also ratmen and pegasus knights and elves.

To come, I really need to go through and convert all the D&D references to WFRP, but we'll see how it goes.

Wednesday, February 13, 2019

[Warhammer4Friends] Actual Play: The Siege


So two sessions worth of recaps this time. I've embedded the video play recordings here too. We had some pretty fun shenanigans, although our friend Brad had to drop out due to health/chemo awfulness.

The Siege
System: The inestimable Warhammer Fantasy Roleplay (4th edition)
Characters: Boneshard, Norscan Berserker (marauder career); Regis d'Pubiens, Bretonnian Spy

Returning to the siege camp, Boneshard nurses his arrow wounds from the battle between Ermengard and Agravaine's forces. Agravaine has been driven back to his castle, on a hill overlooking the valley with the stream where the battle took place. Regis, gossiping in camp, learns the two sides agree to a prisoner exchange and that Duke Armand is coming to negotiate a peace. Ermengard comes to the characters, suggesting they would be well-rewarded if they killed Agravaine when he comes and removed that treacherous bastard.

About a week later, Lord Chrodegar asks Boneshard as a doughty guard to accompany him to the prisoner exchange, among them his son, Sir Chilfroy. There, Boneshard is called out by a brawny knight named Sir Bohemond the Strong, Honor Guard of Lord Agravaine.

After the exchange, the characters go to the feast with the Duke, Agravaine, and Ermengard in attendance. From their view at the low tables, things do not appear to be going smoothly. Lady Griselda, the adventurers' old sponsor, greets them, asking why they betrayed her. The adventurers make excuses, and Griselda informs them that she does not trust Agravaine and fears for the Duke. There is an arm wrestling contest between Boneshard and Sir Bohemond, ending in a close Boneshard victory, to the merriment of all.

After the feast, the heroes try to investigate Agravaine's tent, pondering following up on the idea to assassinate him. But Agravaine rides off to his keep with some horsemen before anything is achieved. Soon, they hear shouts from the Duke's tent, and discover he has been marked by an assassin, who escaped, with a triangle inside a circle, burned into his flesh. The Damsel Helvis has placed him into a magical slumber, delaying the deadly poison she believes infects him, but cannot heal him. Plans are made with Lord Ermengard to assault Agravaine's castle to kill him, while the host will assault the walls.


Entering the castle...

(Overall note: this was a really fun session for me to DM as it was action packed and the culmination of several prior sessions' worth of set up.)

Agravaine's Castle, side view.

The next session the adventurers, informed by a servant who was captured by Ermengard's knights, climb up the rocky clifface behind Agravaine's keep to several sewage grates for the keep. Hearing the sounds of assault on the walls, Boneshard pried off one of the grates leading into the keep's dungeon and they entered the darkness (they decided to shut their lantern). They heard the sound of breathing from beyond the shit they crawled through, and then were ambushed by something that could see in the dark while they could not. With luck, Boneshard managed to parry the sound of a swishing blade in the darkness.

Opening the lantern, they found themselves in a large cell with several ratmen, and a waking, hulking giant of a ratman - a rat ogre! They hew through the ratmen, and narrowly escape dying at the hands of the rat ogre by slamming the cell door shut and tossing a burning oil flask (molotov) onto him. They run away down the dungeon hall, heading for stairs and fling flaming oil towards their foes.

They then trick the two men guarding the dungeon door leading into the keep itself, they apparently being tasked with keeping the ratmen in. After bamboozling the knights guarding the door, the adventurers betray them and kill them. They then try to whistle their way out of the area ('nothing to see here boys'). After some quick exploring, they find themselves going down a long hallway behind the main feast hall leading to some stairs. At this point, both Boneshard and Regis are wounded.

Running down the stairs, Regis runs smack dab into the armored chest of Sir Bohemond, who is escorted two ratmen down the stairs. He slashes Regis badly with a sword before Boneshard tackles him. Regis lights two flasks with a burning wick. The adventurers then manage to wrench open Bohemond's facemask and smash a flask onto his face, while another flask is tossed into the ratmen. Bohemond runs screaming down the hall, the ratmen, one of which was clearly a sorcerer of some sort, scurrying after as the adventurers run up the stairs deeper into the castle.

After peeking into the throne room and seeing Lord Agravaine bent over a map table with his counselors, they decided the room's armored guards would be too much in their current state and climbed higher on the stairs. On the next floor, Regis snuck into the corridor to see a drowsy guard. He was not noticed, but his attempt to garrote the man fumbled terribly, the guard escaping and yelling alarums. The two high tailed down the hall, squeezing through a narrow window and swinging outside on a grappling hook. They succeeded in not breaking their legs (taking more wounds) as they swung onto the outer wall of the castle.

[WFRP] Ratmen!



Here are some rat baddies aka Skaven for Wfrp4. I made these for an adventure in which the adventurers plunged into the sewers beneath Bordeleaux, actually well-engineered as built by the Sea Elves in days of yore. The adventurers sought an ancient, golden Idol of Flies (it looked like a Fly yes), that the ratmen had obtained. They had sought the Duke of Bordeleaux's help, and I allowed them to bring some elvish embassy archers and knights as companions. Still they were pretty badly mauled by my ratmen, though so critical hits with flaming oil provided for success.

The stats are based on the skaven examples in the book, modified by yours truely. The book says use their specific monster "Traits" to create different stats, but that's fairly annoying and slow for no reason (you can simply add +30-40 to experienced wizard-types in Intelligence and WP, add some +10/+15 to skills, and voila, stats).

The equipment stats are based on the wfrp 2nd edition Children of the Horned Rat stuff which is super gnarly and awesome. The plague censor flails and death gas globes were taken from that, removing the +1d10 random damage thing because 4th edition does not do that. The spells for the Grey Seer are a mixture of spell ideas stolen from Horned Rat and Witch and Arcane Magick spells in the book. (Note: my Casting Numbers (CN) are for how I do magic (basically, harder spells are more difficult to cast, there's not a target number of successes), you'll have to make your own if following 4th edition spellcasting rules as written.)

Without further ado:

Skavenslaves
M
WS
BS
S
T
I
Ag
Dex
Int
WP
Fel
W
5
25
25
25
25
35
35
30
30
15
20
7
Traits: Spear or cudgel +5, disease (ratte fever), night vision, infected


Vermintail, the Grey Seer 
M
WS
BS
S
T
I
Ag
Dex
Int
WP
Fel
W
5
30
30
30
30
60
55
30
60
55
40
14

Traits: Staff of the Horned One 40 +6 and crippling pain, spells (magick 70, channel 65):
poison breath (CN-10, D+3, ignore AP),
creeping menace (CN-10, swarm of rats for 5 rounds: Small, WS35, bite +4, T25, WP15, W25, ignore psychology, can disengage, always deathblow if hit, inflict 1W each round),
crippling pain (CN-30, stunned, +20 Endurance or also unconscious, lasts 5 rounds, channel to continue), curse (CN-20, target -10 to all, cannot spend Fortune, lasts 5 days, need 1 object/part of target),
terror (CN-10, Cool test or Broken = # of negative SLs)
plague (CN-30, targets within 15 yards, Endurance-10 or immediately contract pneumatic Black Plague (fatigue -10, fever -10 all physical, daily death test +20))
toxic rain (CN-30, 55 yard diameter rain cloud, all -10 Endurance or +2 D, ignores AP, and Endurance or fall into Unconscious nightmare-filled sleep, lasts 5 rounds)
veil of flies (CN-10, 5 rounds, 5 yard diameter of caster filled with flies, -20 to all tests inside it and -20 to hit with ranged as obscured)


Plague Monk Censor-Bearers
M
WS
BS
S
T
I
Ag
Dex
Int
WP
Fel
W
5
45
35
35
35
40
50
30
30
30
30
12
Traits: Plague Censors +9 (-10 enemy parry, impact first rd. (+ones to D), plaguewind on hit: -20 Endurance or lose 1d5 additional W with no AP, +10 Endurance or +1 Corruption, also infected), robes, gasmasks, mutated, night vision.


Gutterunners
M
WS
BS
S
T
I
Ag
Dex
Int
WP
Fel
W
6
46
47
39
38
63
61
36
46
45
29
12
Traits: Poisoned dagger +5 (56) (-1 W/rd., -10 all tests until Endurance, then left Fatigued), sling +7 (57) (pummel), shield (AP5), tracker (56), wallcrawler (61)


Poisonwind Globadiers
M
WS
BS
S
T
I
Ag
Dex
Int
WP
Fel
W
6
46
47
39
38
63
61
36
46
45
29
12
Traits: poisonwind globe +4 ignore APs (57) (Blast 3, Dangerous, for 2 rounds after: -10 Endurance or take D4 ignoring AP)


Incendiaries are Blast 4, Dangerous, D=+1/SL Ablaze, range SB.